1997 Resolutions

RESOLUTIONS TO BE ADOPTED AT THE 127TH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE MICHIGAN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY

December 1997

Project G.R.E.E.E.N.

I.          The fruit industry in Michigan is facing a growing number of significant challenges in the process of growing and marketing their crops. For many of these challenges we look to Michigan State University to provide solutions. The Michigan State Horticultural Society would like to reaffirm its support for fully funding MSU’s Project G.R.E.E.E.N.

Labor

II.          Whereas the Michigan fruit industry is highly dependent upon labor, and whereas in recent years, for a variety of reasons, there are concerns about shortages of labor to harvest and process/pack the crops, therefore be it resolved that the Michigan State Horticultural Society supports:

  1. increased funding in state housing grants,
  2. expanding and simplifying entry into the US for temporary seasonal agricultural workers, and
  3. the development of more structured networking within the growing community.

Fireblight

III.         Antibiotic resistant bacteria of “fireblight” will soon be the decision maker, throughout our state, on what apple varieties will be planted.

To ensure the continued growth and development of our state’s apple industry, the Michigan State Horticultural Society adopts this resolution encouraging the Michigan Apple Committee and Farm Bureau to continue to seek funding to develop new and alternative control measures offireblight, in cooperation with other growing regions of the United States.

Deer Control

IV.        The Michigan State Horticultural Society request the Department of Natural Resources to help provide funds for fencing deer out of apple orchards and other produce areas.

In addition to the economic cost of fruit and tree loss, we have a potential public health issue which needs to be addressed.

Perhaps funding can be provided by an escrow fund established with monies from license fees.

Producers in other states may already have a competitive advantage, because they have fencing programs, through their DNR already in place.

Food Quality Protection Act

V.        Since the Delaney Clause will no longer apply, we in the fruit industry need to work with the Environmental Protection Agency to insure that all commodities have economical alternatives to the loss of any chemicals that are vital to the fruit industry. This may be done in many ways, including new ways to use old chemicals, working on the development of alternative chemicals before the banning of the old ones, and the increased use of Integrated Pest Management when possible.

The Michigan State Horticultural Society supports “industry groups” efforts to ensure that the Food Quality Protection Act implementation is based on sound science and the economic impact it will have.

Dr. Jerry Hull

VI.        Whereas Dr. Jerome Hull, Jr. has faithfully served the Michigan fruit industry for over 33 years as a professor of Horticulture and specifically served as Executive Secretary of the Michigan State Horticultural Society for 25 years where he led the Society in hosting one of the strongest and most respected annual horticultural conventions in the nation, therefore be it resolved that the Michigan State Horticultural Society honors and thanks Dr. Jerome Hull for his many years of outstanding service to this industry.

Dr. Ramsdell

VII.       Whereas Dr. Don Ramsdell has diligently served the Michigan fruit industry for 25 years as a professor of Botany and Plant Pathology, and has worked to determine methods toward the prevention and control of diseases of small fruits and viruses of tree fruits, therefore be it resolved that the Michigan State Horticultural Society honors and thanks Dr. Don Ramsdell for his many years of outstanding service to this industry.

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