2005 MSHS Scholarship Recipients

Adam James Dietrich Michigan State University) 

is working on his Master’s Degree, majoring in horticulture. He has worked on his family’s farm and worked in Postharvest Research on apples and various fruits at MSU. Adam’s plans after graduation include working for a chemical company working for the fruit and vegetable industry inMichigan or managing a fruit packing and processing plant.

Brian C. Hosmer (Michigan State University) 

Majoring in Viticulture and Enology, Brian will be receiving his Master’s Degree in 2006. He works in his department in the vineyards trellising, pruning, harvesting, irrigation installation, fruit assessment, and has worked for the laboratory and winery. Brian would like to stay in Michigan to share his gained knowledge with other fruit growers to improve fruit quality and reduce usage of sprays by sharing scouting practices and disease/pest information.

Juliette King (Michigan State University) 

Juliette is working on her Bachelor’s Degree in Agri-business Management and Horticulture. Growing up on a farm, Juliette has been very active in all aspects of farming, including office and retail sales to cherry harvest and labor. She would like to return to her father’s farm and further expand its operations and would like to eventually start a vineyard and winery with a tasting room.

Stevie Lynn Malone (Michigan State University) 

Stevie Lynn is working on her Bachelor’s Degree in plant pathology. She has extensive experience scouting fruit and vegetable crops and is working for West Central Michigan Crop Management Association. Stevie plans to pursue her Master and PhD degrees in Plant Pathology, and become a university professor and conduct research on fruit and/or vegetable crops to help farmers prevent and control devastating crop pathogens.

Nobuko Sugimot (Michigan State University) 

Nobuko’s goal is to receive her PhD in Postharvest Physiology. She is currently working in the area of biosynthesis of apple aroma during ripening from the biochemistry and genetic aspects in the relationship to the apple’s physiology. Her goal is to maintain and improve the flavor in fruits and vegetables to benefit both producers and consumers.